Mountain View Cemetery History

The Mountain Home (Mountain View Cemetery) provides a lot of history in and around Elmore County.

Oldest Erected Headstone in Mountain View Cemetery

Oldest Erected Headstone in Mountain View Cemetery

Headstone of Commodore George Jackson who first owned the area where Mountain Home is presently located and used it as a large family ranch

Headstone of Commodore George Jackson who first owned the area where Mountain Home is presently located and used it as a large family ranch

Mail courier from Rocky Bar who delivered mail on foot between Featherville & Rocky Bar.  Charlie was found in the spring of 1964 along his route and had froze to death during the winter

Mail courier from Rocky Bar who delivered mail on foot between Featherville & Rocky Bar. Charlie was found in the spring of 1964 along his route and had froze to death during the winter

Spanish American War Veteran Hector A. Beach who fought in the Spanish American War

Spanish American War Veteran Hector A. Beach who fought in the Spanish American War

Civil War Veterans buried in Mountain View Cemetery

Civil War Veterans buried in Mountain View Cemetery Civil War Veterans buried in Mountain View Cemetery

Soldiers from Elmore County who were killed in action during the Great War (WWI)

Soldiers from Elmore County who were killed in action during the Great War (WWI) Soldiers from Elmore County who were killed in action during the Great War (WWI)

One of the more popular men buried in the cemetery is that of John McKeown better known as “Johnny-Behind-the-Rocks”.  He was originally a placer miner by trade.  Before coming to the Mountain Home vicinity, he was in Silver City, Idaho City, North Idaho and Rocky Bar.  He finally took up homesteading near Dixie and spent the rest of his life raising cattle and horses.  Needless to say he was in many ways, very odd, although he was generous to those he liked.

One of the more popular men buried in the cemetery is that of John McKeown better known as “Johnny-Behind-the-Rocks”. He was originally a placer miner by trade. Before coming to the Mountain Home vicinity, he was in Silver City, Idaho City, North Idaho and Rocky Bar. He finally took up homesteading near Dixie and spent the rest of his life raising cattle and horses. Needless to say he was in many ways, very odd, although he was generous to those he liked.